NADP Opposes Rules Limiting Access for Dental Patients Keep Reading

Improving Community Health and Reducing Costs

One of the most important benefits of DSOs in Texas is the increased availability of quality dental care for patient populations that would otherwise go without dental care.

Because DSO-supported practices are able to charge lower fees and accept more insurance plans than non DSO-supported practices, many patients are able to schedule appointments and receive the essential care they require on a regular basis to maintain good oral health.

Evidence clearly supports that routine dental care is important to overall health, life expectancy and quality of life. Good oral health care provided by quality dental providers is key to improving the overall health status of Texans, and helping reduce the related healthcare expenditures associated with emergencies resulting from lack of routine care. 

Texas Access to Care Statistics

  • Texas has one of the lowest rates of dentists per 10,000 civilian population – 4.6  (compared to National average of 6.0). [1]
  • 61.7% of adults visited a dental clinic in 2010, compared to a national average of 68.5%.  Texas is one of the lowest states for adults who have visited the dentist. [2]
  • In 2005, Texans paid nearly 54% of their dental expenditures out of pocket – compared to the national average of 49%.  Of the 10 largest states, Texas had the third highest percentage of dental expenses paid out of pocket after Florida and New Jersey.[3]
  • In 2005, private insurance paid for about 38% of dental care expenditures in Texas – compared to the national average of 43%.[4]
  • In 2003, Texas had the highest percentage of children without dental coverage among the 10 largest states (32%).[5]
  • The rate of untreated tooth decay among Texas children is higher in Texas than the rest of the US (29% for children ages 2 – 4; 44% for children 6 – 8)[6]
  • In 2003, 59% of children living at or 99% of the Federal Poverty Level visited a dentist office; compared to 78% of those at 400%+ the FPL.[7]
  • In 2006, 36% of adults with annual income below $15K had their teeth cleaned within the last year; compared to 77% of those with income greater than $50K (stats from Texas)[8]
  • 19.3% of Texas residents live in a Dental Health Professional Shortage Area.[9]
  • 14.1% of Texas adults, age 65+ have had all natural teeth extracted.[10]
  • In 2006, there were 8,453 dentists, and the supply ratio (general dentists per 100,000 population) was 36.0.  This compares to a 2004 US supply ration of 59.4.  Texas lags far behind.[11]  In 2011, the ratio rose to 38.3.[12]
  • In 2006, in urban areas the supply ratio was 37.9; in rural areas it was 23.6.[13]
  • Average age of general dentists in 2006: 47.8 yrs old.[14]
  • Most dentists in Texas are general dentists – 9,909 out of 11,751.[15]
  • As of December 2011, there were 46 Texas counties with no dentists.[16]
  • 115 Texas counties are classified as Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas.[17]

Additional Resources:

DSO-Supported Dentists: Giving Back At Home and Abroad

Texas: Dental Health Professional Shortage Areas

DrBicuspid.com – DSOs Part of the Access to Care Solution

[Infographic] Floss or Die – The Effects of Poor Oral Hygiene on Your Health


[1] Kaiser statehealthfacts.org.

[2] Kaiser statehealthfacts.org.

[3] Building Better Oral Health: A Dental Home for All Texans.  A report commissioned by the TDA, Fall 2008.

[4] Building Better Oral Health: A Dental Home for All Texans.  A report commissioned by the TDA, Fall 2008.

[5] Building Better Oral Health: A Dental Home for All Texans.  A report commissioned by the TDA, Fall 2008.

[6] Building Better Oral Health: A Dental Home for All Texans.  A report commissioned by the TDA, Fall 2008.

[7] Building Better Oral Health: A Dental Home for All Texans.  A report commissioned by the TDA, Fall 2008.

[8] Building Better Oral Health: A Dental Home for All Texans.  A report commissioned by the TDA, Fall 2008.

[9] Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. Key Facts, June 2012.

[10] Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured. Key Facts, June 2012.

[11] Highlights: The Supply of General Dentists in Texas – 2006, Health Professions Resource Center at the Center for Health Statistics, Department of State Health Services (March 2007).

[12] Supply Trends Among Licensed Health Professions Texas 1980- 2011, Health Professions Resource Center at the Center for Health Statistics, Department of State Health Services (January 2012)

[13] Highlights: The Supply of General Dentists in Texas – 2006, Health Professions Resource Center at the Center for Health Statistics, Department of State Health Services (March 2007).

[14] Highlights: The Supply of General Dentists in Texas – 2006, Health Professions Resource Center at the Center for Health Statistics, Department of State Health Services (March 2007).

[15] Supply Trends Among Licensed Health Professions Texas 1980- 2011, Health Professions Resource Center at the Center for Health Statistics, Department of State Health Services (January 2012)

[16] Supply Trends Among Licensed Health Professions Texas 1980- 2011, Health Professions Resource Center at the Center for Health Statistics, Department of State Health Services (January 2012)

[17] Supply Trends Among Licensed Health Professions Texas 1980- 2011, Health Professions Resource Center at the Center for Health Statistics, Department of State Health Services (January 2012)

 

 

Leave a Reply